Hahnemann Cemetery (Grave) LIVE 360

Hahnemann died there at 5am on 2 July 1843 and Melanie kept his body there before burial until the 11 July. He was buried in the Cimetiere de Montmartre to the north of Paris in what is popularly called the ‘artists’ quarter’. He was buried in grave number 8 and in 1878 Melanie was buried ingrave number 9.

Hahnemann Grave No.8, Cimetiere de Montmartre, Paris

Hahnemann Grave No.8, Cimetiere de Montmartre, Paris

On the insistence of wealthy American homoeopaths, in 1898 it was agreed that his grave should be opened, so his remains could be moved to the more prestigious Cimetière du Pere Lachaise. On May 24, 1898 the two graves were opened and theremains identified from a large lock of Melanie’s hair around his neck and from his engraved wedding ring. The bodies were moved to a much grander tomb in the Lachaise cemetery which can still be seen. It is a ‘celebrity’ grave along with many other Paris notables from the last century and also from this.

More than a million and a half people come to Pere-Lachaise each year, to walk its nearly 109 acres consisting of tens of thousands of monuments, many of which are dedicated to some of the world’s greatest names in the arts, sciences, literature and of course history. Here’s just a sample:

Francois Poulenc, Heloise and Abelard, Camille Pissaro, Cherubini, Chopin, Breguet (yes the watch guy), Lalique (the glass guy), Michel Petrucciani, Auguste Comte, Champollion, Samuel Hahnemann, Gustave Dore, Jim Morrison, Moliere, La Fontaine, Murat, Antoine Parmentier, Sarah Bernhardt, Balzac, Delacroix, Merleau-Ponty, Georges Melies, Edith Piaf, Bizet, Marcel Proust, Apollinaire, Isadora Duncan, Stephane Grappelli, Richard Wright, Auguste Blanqui, Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas, Modigliani, Edith Piaf, Colette, Oscar Wilde.

CLICK THE BELOW TO SEE 360 DEGREE VIEW OF HAHNEMANN’S CEMETARY


Hahnemann cemetery directions Paris
How to reach: Hahnemann cemetery directions Paris. 19th sector 34th Grave.
Hahnemann bust at cemetery with caption 'Non inutilis vixi` (I have not lived in vain. Hahnemann wrote these words as a suitable inscription for his own monument on July 28, 1839.)
Hahnemann bust at cemetery with caption ‘Non inutilis vixi` (I have not lived in vain. Hahnemann wrote these words as a suitable inscription for his own monument on July 28, 1839.)

 

Angel with the leaf of eternal peace, lingers the heaven-born consciousness of a life devoted to duty, science, art, the welfare of mankind and the service of God.

By the side of this angel stands another, the certainty that nothing really good, really beneficial, can ever perish, but defies death and the grave, continuing in everlasting activity, and thus identifying itself with the highest order of things and the government of the universe. A third angel hovers there, revealing to our gaze the name of Hahnemann, and the significant words ‘Non inutilis vixi` (I have not lived in vain. Hahnemann wrote these words as a suitable inscription for his own monument on July 28, 1839.) are graven there as with a sunbeam.”

 

Hahnemann's Cemetary at Pere Lachaise Cemetary, Paris

Hahnemann’s Cemetery at Pere Lachaise Cemetary, Paris

Hahnemann cemetery Paris
Hahnemann cemetery Paris
Hahnemann cemetery Paris
Dr.Nisanth Nambison & Dr.Smita Nambison at Hahnemann Cemetery, Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris

Hahnemann Cemetary, Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris

Dr.Nisanth Nambison & Dr.Smita Nambison at Hahnemann Cemetery, Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris

Hahnemann bust at cemetery
In deep thought, Hahnemann bust at cemetery
Hahnemann bust at cemetery
Hahnemann bust at cemetery

Hahnemann Cemetary, Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris

LIGA delegates at Hahnemann Cemetery, Cimetière du Père Lachaise, Paris

Courtesy: Dr. Olivier Rabanes, Paris, www.homeoint.org, http://aosh.pagesperso-orange.fr/Melanie.htm